Evil bosses put logic before women

More than half of UK bosses assess the chances of a member of staff falling pregnant before employing them, a survey suggests.

And 76% of managers admitted that they would not hire a new recruit if they knew they were going to fall pregnant within six months of starting the job.

And why wouldn’t they? There are two points of view to consider here, that of the woman, and that of the business. The woman is obviously looking out for herself, so why can’t the business?

Employment Law Advisory Services (ELAS) said discrimination was prevalent, despite legislation to outlaw it.

There had been a rise in cases over pregnancy and new starters, ELAS added.

About 52% of those surveyed said that they considered the chances of a candidate getting pregnant taking into account age and whether they have just got married.

Legally, a direct question to a potential employee cannot be asked.

That’s helpful. So now women cannot even defend themselves in an interview, the business has to decide without that additional information. Naturally, they will err on the side of caution, because getting it wrong could get very expensive as well as disruptive. By the way, if women are so strong and empowered, why do they need additional legislation to ‘protect’ them? I’m sure they can handle it on their own? Continue reading

Advertisements

The Folly of ‘Equal Opportunity Law’

Sir Alan Sugar warned last night that equal opportunity laws have made it harder for a woman to get a job.

Employers are not allowed to ask women about having children – so they would just not employ them, he said.

The self-made millionaire and star of BBC TV’s The Apprentice added: “Everything has gone too far. We have maternity laws where people are entitled to too much.

“If someone comes into an interview and you think to yourself ‘there is a possibility that this woman might have a child and therefore take time off’ it is a bit of a psychological negative thought.

“If they are applying for a position which is very important, then I should imagine that some employers might think ‘this is a bit risky’.

“They would like to ask the question ‘Are you planning to get married and to have any children?.”

Sir Alan claimed that the current-laws are “counter-productive for women”. Continue reading